Join us Tonight: NARRATIVE ATLAS by Gerry Trilling

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Join us tonight: First Friday 5:00 – 9:00 PM  for NARRATIVE ATLAS, an exhibition featuring resident artist Gerry Trilling, on view from 05.12.17 to 06.16.17

NARRATIVE ATLAS is an exhibition of constructed paintings, text and small drawings.  “Narratives are built into maps; where and how you begin, where and why you want to go, how and by what means you get there.  An atlas is a book of maps filled with stories. NARRATIVE ATLAS is a mainframe for my meditation on assimilation. What stories we keep, what memories we will lose, and what will happen next. The unknown is always rich territory for an artist.”   

 Hours: Tues – Friday     10:00 -12:00 PM & 1:00  – 4:00  PM, Saturday            12:00 – 4:00  PM   Address: 1708 Campbell – KCMO – 64108

 

 

Caitlin Horsmon

Caitlin Horsmon

Caitlin is an artist, curator and teacher based in Kansas City Missouri who makes films, videos and installations. Her work has been exhibited around the world and she has received numerous awards and grants including a Rocket Grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Charlotte Street Foundation and Spencer Museum of Art. Caitlin is one of six artists who make up the curatorial collaboration and artist-run space Plug Projects.  She is Associate Professor of Film & Media Arts at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where she serves as a member of the Women’s and Gender Studies and Graduate faculties.

Her work is distributed by The Collectif Jeune Cinéma.

My work examines the material world by mining stories from places, bodies and objects. With attention to location, visual history, identity and absence I explore the imaginary of the everyday to address the politics of knowledge and the loci of perception.

 For me art making is a way to ask questions, and I am curious about how public spaces are constituted, and what gets purposefully excluded or simply overlooked. I make films, videos, photographs and installations, but my practice creates experiences as often as objects, exploring intersections in my life as a citizen, community member and academic through research, programming, collaborations and curation of exhibitions and screenings.  My goal is to dig deeply into the world around me through creating images and sounds, time-based experiences and activities of resistance, and to explore the disposition of the real, the ways we construct and describe our world and the nature of looking.

Misha Kligman

Misha Kligman

Soviet-born artist Misha Kligman immigrated to the United States with his family as a refugee at the age seventeen. Kligman received a BA in Art from the Cleveland State University in 2001 and MFA in Painting and Drawing from University of Kansas in 2009.

Kligman’s work has been exhibited in venues across the Midwest, most recently at the Elmhurst Art Museum, Elmhurst, IL.

In 2015 Kligman was awarded the Charlotte Street Foundation’s Visual Artists Fellowship. Additionally, Kligman is a founding member of Plug Projects – an art space located in the West Bottoms, Kansas City. Kligman lives in works in Kansas City, MO.

Kligman’s art arises from a need to bridge the gap between self and the world. Bodies of Kligman’s work have touched on the questions of identity, displacement, mortality and sentimentality among others. 

 

Miguel Rivera

Miguel Rivera

Miguel Rivera joined the KCAI faculty in fall 2008 to serve as chair of the printmaking department. A practicing artist as well as an experienced educator, Rivera has had numerous solo and group exhibitions in Argentina, Mexico, Japan and the United States.

He earned a B.F.A. degree in printmaking and painting in 1995 from Southern Oregon University in Ashland.Rivera also has given visiting artist lectures in Mexico, Peru, Argentina and the United States, including Southern Graphics Council conferences. Lately he has visited Project ACE in Buenos Aires, Argentina and Guanlan Print Studio in Guanlan China and the 2013 Printmaking biennial in Lima, Peru; these visits were under their respective artists in residency and visiting artists programs. His work was featured at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO. He is represented by Todd Weiner gallery in Kansas City.

In my work, images are manipulated, layered, and placed in combination with rendered drawings and prints in an environment that conveys a sacred space. The materials that are used serve as metaphors for the passage of time, memory and the human condition. The layering of the surface functions as a contemporary chaotic interpretation. Placing images in this manner helps to reconstruct, examine, and reinvent memories of my infant experience. At the same time, layering of these personal icons creates a double edge or ambiguity of related themes, ie., the beauty of pathos in suffering. This ambiguity relates to the experience of traveling, living in several environments, displacement while collecting a visual memory along this path. My core referential images have evolved into a series of abstractions from ephemeral experiences witnessing the pathos in Mexican culture. These works provide a platform for several inner experiences. Although these images are visually flat, they seek to engage the viewer in an installation setting by invading one´s space. Iconographic images of lethal viruses have become a base for some of my abstractions for the past two years; I have used the simple form of series and repetition of these viruses to represent their multiplicity and prevalent presence. The danger that viruses, such as Evian flu, H1N1, Bubonic Plague and Malaria represent, are in contrast with their microscopic yet fetishistic appearance. The integration of a viral pattern became the main driver after witnessing the massive death of birds in Arkansas this past year 2010.  A fading image of a Peruvian pigeon was a metaphor for our collective damage to the environment. At the same time, a burned drawing using a laser on paper made a symbolic and significant statement of this act.

Patty Carroll

Patty Carroll

Patty Carroll - Planty

Patty Carroll is known for her use of highly intense, saturated color photographs since the 1970’s. Her most recent project, “Anonymous Women”, is a 3-part series of studio installations made for the camera, addressing women and domestic status, and camouflages the figure in drapery and/or domestic objects. The photographs are exhibited in large scale and the work is published as a monograph to be released in the fall of 2016 by Daylight Books. This work has been exhibited in China several times, as well as won various awards. Carroll was one of the “Top 50” awarded by Photolucida in 2014. Carroll taught photography for many years and has enthusiastically returned to the studio to delight viewers with her sense of humor and critique of home life.


Her work is represented by Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Martha Schneider Gallery in Chicago, and Martine Chaisson Gallery in New Orleans, and has been collected nationally and internationally.

I make studio photographs that are commentary about women, home, and identity. In the “Anonymous Women: Draped” photographic series, a lone woman is hidden in a vignette within the drapery, where she performs domestic trickery. Her identity is fused with the domestic trappings of home. The “Anonymous Women: Reconstructed Series” is commentary on obsession with collecting, accumulating, designing and decorating, inviting hilarity and pathos about our relationship with “things.”  They are installations made in the studio for the camera that play with color, space and scale, and use household objects as subject matter. I am photographically creating worlds that debunk, critique and satirize myths of domestic, claustrophobic perfection.

http://www.pattycarroll.com/

Hye Young Shin

Hye Young Shin

Hye Young Shin - Untitled

Hye Young Shin is the Assistant Professor of Print Media in the Department of Art & Art History in the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Shin received Master of Fine Art from University at Buffalo, and two BFAs in Printmaking and Painting from Hong-Ik University and Kyoung-Sung University in Korea. Shin exhibited across the US, including solo shows at the Fine Art Gallery in the San Francisco Sate University, CA; UB Anderson Gallery in the University at Buffalo, NY; 20|20 Gallery of the Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop in the Elizabeth Arts Foundation, New York City, NY; Big Orbit Gallery, Buffalo, NY; Western New York Book Arts Center, Buffalo, NY, and has been featured in many group shows nationally and internationally.

Shin’s artistic practice is an embodiment of a lifetime of accumulated experiences. Her artwork centers on visualizing connections that make human relationships and kindle new meaning and the value of art. She believes that communication is the key to establishing a strong sense of belongings between artists, viewers, and community. The issues she confronts through her work stem from early experience and observation. At a young age, she became aware of death and human vulnerability through illnesses in her family. She sought to explore a theatrical and situational empathy to deliver an intimate communication among us and strives to create some sort of ambiguous space where we are not able to define ourselves through the notion of race, language, and culture. We can only realize ourselves as human beings without prejudice. Influenced by childhood experiences and present time of her practice, Shin’s work speaks of humanity, happiness and freedom of the individual and utopian society.

Debra M Smith

Debra M Smith

Debra M Smith

Debra M Smith - Untitled

Debra Smith was raised in Hannibal, Missouri and currently works and resides in Kansas City, Missouri. She graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute with a B.F.A in textiles and later received an Associates Degree in Applied Science from the Fashion Institute of Technology. She recently returned to the Midwest after living for almost a decade in Brooklyn, New York.

I am not a poet or someone who draws, but I feel that my use of vintage textiles as a medium brings a history, a weight, and a poetry to the work before I even begin to cut, sew, and piece the work back together. Allowing the work to intuitively flow through me I do feel the end result is similar to a drawing or poetry. My textile abstractions provide the stimulus for the viewer’s imagination.

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Gerry Trilling

Gerry Trilling

Gerry Trilling - Flower

Gerry Trilling received her B.F.A. in Painting from KCAI. In 2001 she received a Kansas Arts Commission Mini Fellowship and in 2008 she received a Professional Development Grant from the Creative Capital Foundation. In 2014 she was selected for inclusion in The Kansas City Collection III. Her most recent solo exhibits were In Site at City Ice Arts, Kansas City, MO and Gerry Trilling at Centric Projects in Kansas City, Missouri. Her work was also in a two-person showcase at Zora at la Esquina, Kansas City, Missouri. Recent group shows include National Women in the Arts 2012 Biennial Kansas City at UMKC, Between Thee and Me at Epsten Gallery, Kansas City Museum of Contemporary Art in Overland Park, Kansas. Upcoming exhibitions include The Transformers, curated by China Marks (2016) at the Foosaner Museum of Art in Melbourne, Florida.

I’m building a narrative of sofa signposts, of belonging and integration. I shop, build, and scout flea markets and upscale fabric stores. Material culture references many things: changing taste, usage, culture and most of all, time.  

My parents came to St. Louis from Vienna to escape the Holocaust. Our neighborhood and social circle consisted of immigrants like us, Jews from all over Europe, each family with its own traditions, foods and sofas. Ours was covered in a fashionable nubby dark green bouclé.  As time went on and we integrated into American culture our place narrative changed. We moved out of apartments, bought houses in different neighborhoods and as we expanded our definition of identity, we bought different sofas.

The stuff of material culture is full of discovery that is so idiosyncratic, so personal, so emotional, so very odd. It is noisy and messy and describes human life, its wants, needs and desires, as well as daily life from time before and what’s to come.

Ricky Allman

Ricky Allman

Ricky Allman - Untitled

Ricky Allman (b. 1978, Provo, UT USA) received an MFA with Honors from the Rhode Island School of Design and a BFA with Distinction from the Massachusetts College of Art. Allman’s paintings often appear as landscapes, psychological landscapes, and cityscapes. Utilizing the geographic landscape of his childhood in the Rocky Mountains, modernist architecture and gestural abstraction, Allman’s work reflects an indefinite future; a complicated and frenetic world of colliding forms often in the moment of origination. His work has been exhibited and published nationally and internationally including Paris, Copenhagen, New York, Miami, and more. Allman lives and works in Kansas City, MO where he is a Professor of Painting/Drawing at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

My work primarily deals with images, memories and feelings associated with growing up as a Mormon in Utah. Although I am now, for the most part, very secular in my beliefs, I am fascinated by religious extremists, End of Days prophecies, and the intersection between architecture and nature. I use fractured and chaotic spaces as a metaphor for general unease and anxiety about the state of the world and the environment. This is often contrasted with vivid colors that hopefully offer a glimmer of hope in an otherwise dreary and fatal view.

Tanya E. Hartman

Tanya E. Hartman

Tanya Hartman - Secrets

Tanya Hartman came of age in New York City, where she attended The Brearley School. Large portions of her childhood were also spent in Cuernavaca, Mexico and in London, England. She was educated at The Rhode Island School Of Design, where she obtained a BFA in Painting in 1987. Between 1992-1994 she was a graduate student in Painting at Yale University. After her graduation from Yale (MFA/Painting, 1994) she was a Fulbright Scholar in Stockholm, Sweden. She now teaches painting and drawing at the University of Kansas where she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Art. She is represented by Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri and is the recipient of numerous grants and awards.

My art addresses loss and uses a visual language composed of a diverse and sometimes contradictory array of processes. The choice to bring disparate and incongruous materials into proximity reflects my view that the experience of reality is complex and layered with both beauty and suffering. I have always felt that making art is an act of love and defiance because it reveals the truths that unite us across cultural boundaries and geographic barriers. It is my hope that each story heard in the creation of my work, whether it was the throb of my own pain or that same insistent rhythm observed in another, has the capacity to reveal both the brutality and the enduring goodness of the human heart.

Miles Neidinger

Miles Neidinger

Miles Neidinger - City Ice (2014)

Neidinger, born in July of 1976 in Kansas City MO, graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute in 2000 with a BFA in sculpture. His artistic visualization has been informed by his experience in the commercial and industrial electrical industry. As an electrician he has discovered real life functions for color-coding, tape, conduit bending, and installations, the utilization of trigonometry, algebraic equations, and geometric functions. These experiences drastically inform his artistic practice. Recent exhibitions include: The Anatomy of the Palace of Wisdom City Ice Arts in Kansas City MO, Art in the Pro Flatiron Building New York NY (presented by Sprint), Museum Interrupted Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in Overland Park KS, An Associate Degree in Science Finch Gallery in Chicago IL, What’s the Matter with Kansas Rare Gallery in New York NY, Family Event Home for the Holidays Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City MO, Charlotte Street Fund Exhibition Johnson County Community Collage in Overland Park KS. Neidinger is an Arts KC and Rocket grant recipient, an Art Through Architecture participant, a Charlotte Street Foundation Award recipient and was granted a Vermont Studio Center residency in 2001. His work has been published in Art in America, The Kansas City Star, Review Magazine, and Pitch Weekly.

The crummiest materials are employed in this work, yet it insists on formal purity; it is a sinister response to a cultural drive to consume excessively, and organize according to object-hood. Although this work employ textures, space, and color to draw us in, it never remains solely dependent upon the materials employed. I ask the viewer to uplift banal material to the realm of beauty. Living several months of my youth among a home remodeling project had a great influence on my work. Being surrounded by clusters of debris, living in a partially deconstructed home influenced my methods of perception. For months I witnessed the tearing out of walls, exposing the raw studs, plumbing pipes, and electrical wiring. My home had an anatomy, and I was helping my parents tear off its skin exposing the skeleton. Reversals are staged between oppositional forces of banality and beauty, synthetic and organic, repulsion and attraction. The work criticizes excess by being excessive. By holding a mirror up for the public to see themselves, I reveal my own proclivities. This notion of enlightenment achieved through the staging of reversals is described in William Blake’s 1790 poem “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell”, where he writes, “The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom”.  The world I have come to see is not covered with items available for evaluation and ranking, but is an endless sheet of categorically synthesized matter that drapes over our environmental landscape.

Jarrett Mellenbruch

Jarrett Mellenbruch

Artist-in-residence from 2013 to 2015.
Jarrett Mellenbruch - a busy solitude

Focusing my attention between public art interventions and my studio practice gives me the balance I need to engage with the world at large as well as escape from it.

Robert Josiah Bingaman

Robert Josiah Bingaman

Artist-in-residence from 2013 to 2015.
Robert Josiah Bingaman - Untitled

The scenes I paint are chosen out of a desire to regain the satisfaction I once associated with the subjects depicted. Lately, I am drawn to America’s designated vistas, the resorts that surround them, and the suburban homes that were dreamt to replicate their pleasures. Specifically, I am interested in the appearance of these places—and how they were built. I desire the experiences they promise without cynicism. Whereas the American Transcendalists narrowed the gap between image and original experience by mastering illusionistic means, I aim to do the same by trading plastic for plastic, flat for flat.

Jill Downen

Jill Downen

Jill Downen

Downen’s art is a focused investigation of the symbiotic relationship between the human body and architecture expressed in temporal installations, drawings, and models. Her art envisions a place of interdependent relation between the human body and architecture, where the exchanging forces and tensions of construction, deterioration, and restoration emerge as thematic possibilities.

Jill Downen is an assistant professor of sculpture at the Kansas City Art Institute, where she teaches in the sculpture department. Significant awards include: 2010 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, MacDowell Colony National Endowment for the Arts residency, and CitÈ International des Arts Residency in Paris. Downen was selected for the 2004 Great Rivers Biennial, a grant and exhibition sponsored by Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and the Gateway Foundation. Downen has been invited to lecture about her work extensively, including the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. and the Luce Irigaray Circle Philosophy Conference in New York. Her art has been reviewed in publications including Art in America, Sculpture, Art Papers, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the New York Times. Downen lives and maintains her studio in Kansas City, and is represented by the Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis. She holds a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA as a Danforth Scholar from Washington University in St. Louis.

The body is the primary vehicle one has for understanding the world. I want to offer viewers immersive environments that heighten the senses and ways of knowing that are often private and experiential. I see architecture as an extension of the body; a prolongation of self. In my visual language, the city is flesh, buildings are like bodies and the human body is a temporal form. I see human culture as being in a state of need for stillness and quietness. I would like to see people slow down. My art offers audiences a place to alter their perceptions in order to see and think in new ways.